Jakobstad, July 16, 2015

It’s has been some time since I’ve posted here, but I haven’t been idle. Besides continuing my treatment plan, I’ve done quite a bit of research in order to increase my understanding of Lyme disease. Self-education is almost mandatory, as most of the knowledge blazed by the conventional medicine is so amazingly biased and, in my opinion, largely consists of pure propaganda. More on this in a dedicated blog post later.

I’ve now entered week seven of eight in my initial treatment of lyme disease. I write initial, as I’ve prepared for a lengthy fight.

I chose an intense treatment – a counter-attack, if you might – the so called augsburg protocol. In short, the protocol is about the favorable interplay of several different antibiotics, nutritional supplements, a change of diet, physical exercise, and detox. The main idea is to attack the bacteria, to flush waste products out of the body, and to re-bild the degraded immune system.

And it works. I’m still far from the shape I was in before I caught lyme, but the tendency is right. It will take time, it is allowed to take time. I’m in no rush, and I won’t give in.

It’s quite possible that my lyme disease, wreaking havoc untreated for approx. fifteen years, might have caused irreversible damage to joints, ligaments and the nervous system – that parts of my body might no longer be mended. Well, then that’s how it is. As long as I know that I do everything in my power to stop the disease from impairing my cognitive functions and my fine motor skills, all treatment is invaluable.

And who knows? Everything I do right now is restoring the balance in my body, and a balanced body holds an amazing ability to heal. Maybe I’ll be good as new, or even better. Time will tell.

Among all the things I’ve learned during this process, one of the most fascinating sounds like cut out of one of the numerous health leaflets I’ve read with eyes half opened all my life: The importance of exercise and sleep.

I’ve always been aware of the benefits of exercise and sleep in maintaining health (even though I’ve sometimes neglected to put it all into practice.) What I now realized, however, is how important getting a good amount of sleep, and – even though often reluctantly – exercising one’s body is for the purpose of speeding up recovery from illnesses such as this.

Exercise raises the oxygen level in the blood, heats up the body, and thus creates an unfavorable environment for the bacteria. Exercise also increases circulation and flushes out waste products. Sleep gives the body time to work, and build – excused from meeting the bigger need for energy during hours awake. Simple things, important matters, in a desire to regain quality of life.

“Liikunta voinnin mukaan” (Finnish, freely translated “Exercise listening to your body”) is emphasized at the clinic where I’m undergoing treatment. It’s all about stressing the body just enough that the positive outcomes outweigh the negative – often temporary – ones. Finding that balance isn’t always quite easy, but one learns through trial and error.

Starting my treatment in the beginning of June, I could jog a little short of 2.5 miles, at a snail’s pace, and a few hours later I already had aching muscles and joints, and nerve buzzing. Entered tinnitus and lightheadedness, lasting for about 36 hours. Two days ago, I jogged (still at a somewhat humble pace) about 4.3 miles, without any other after-effects than a slightly stiff back the following day.

Yes, it gets better. I’m heading in the right direction, and I look positively upon the future. Soon I will try doing some light lifting to see how the body responds – yet another step in my highly personal research.

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