Jakobstad, June 27, 2015

To continue the football (= soccer) analogy I started at the end of my former post, now there is something of a midfield battle going on, with neither me nor my opponent finding any opening passes. 0-0, thus, but I feel like time is on my side here.

If I ever had the slightest doubt that what I feel in my body during the treatment really could be due to a herxheimer reaction, that doubt is gone now. My up-to-then worst day (two days ago) was followed by an even worse day (yesterday). My whole body was in an inflammatory state, and suddenly I had huge neurological problems in the right part of my body – wandering pain, sudden numbness and “electric shocks” down through my leg as well as up behind my ear. It was simply fascinating – even if that word usually is used in more positive contexts.

A rational explanation to what I experienced could surely be hurriedly suggested. The reason would then be that I had subconsciously compensated for my left-side problems the day before yesterday – strained my right side in order “to help” – resulting in yesterday’s problems.

I can immediately calm down possible know-it-alls by reporting that I’ve overcompensated in the suggested way many times in life, but never ever have I experienced something similar to what I did yesterday. It was simply a neurological chaos taking place particularly in one side of the body, in a way that just can’t be explained as a result of strain. Believe me – I conduct an empirical research in my own body.

Counter-attacking, I drew upon every form of detox and medication I could possibly think of, and by evening it all started to ease out. I still feel a bit sick, but it’s getting better all the time.

Since I couldn’t do much more than ride it all out, I took the opportunity to follow up on the SSRI phenomenon I wrote about earlier. I had grown successively more curious, since so many struck by lyme disease had contacted me reporting similar experiences – in short 1) acute illness, 2) the diagnosis depression, 3) prescribed SSRIs, 4) a severe worsening of the illness during the so called break-in period.

A day of couch-conducted research, it was, and I found something highly interesting.

It has earlier been assumed that depression is due to an insufficient amount of signal substance in the brain, and that SSRIs – limiting the reabsorption of serotonine into the presynaptic cells – show good results since the use of these medicines results in an increased amount of signal substance.

More and more, researchers have started questioning whether this is the whole truth. The hypothesis that depression could be caused by inflammation of the brain has been brought forward, and that SSRIs might have effect due to anti-inflammatory properties.

The first research paper regarding this idea was presented a little over three years ago. The results suggest that the hypotesis might be true – results in test tubes (in vitro, lat., literally “in glass”) show that SSRIs at a dosage equivalent to the dosage usually prescribed by doctors seem to have a significant anti-inflammatory effect.
(The abstract at the link above shows a rough brush picture, the full report I read lies behind login and needs to be access either by user account credits or by payment.)

What I – as well as the research team – found even more fascinating was that lower doses had a contrary effect – that is, they promoted inflammation. It doesn’t stop here: the lower doses triggered the microglial cells – the most important part of the immune defense regarding the central nervous system – into starting producing… that’s right, cytokines.

A person struck by lyme disease has far to much cytokines to start with – the body is kind of in a constant inflammatory state. SSRIs have a break-in period, it can take up to many weeks before the accumulation of the active ingredient is large enough in the body to be able to produce the desired anti-inflammatory effect. Up until then, the SSRIs – according to the research in question – just makes the lyme disease symptoms worse.

Not only, then, is lyme disease so often misdiagnosed, but the medication commonly prescribed makes it all even worse. This is another strong reason as to why the lyme disease awareness amongst doctors has to be increased.

Kommentera | Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s